Fanni Kopacsi

Duality and Transformation with Fanni Kopacsi

Browsing through Fanni Kopacsi’s website of art, analogue photography and poetry is an emotionally stirring experience. Fed up with the lies and abuse by the politicians and powers that be, Fanni’s works are both an introspection and a reflection on human behaviour, sociocultural issues and the ecological crisis.

One of the first things to catch my eye was a project called ‘Endangered Species’ created during lockdown in 2020. There are images of the artist in an outfit made from waste textiles holding a painting, dripping in red acrylic paint. The painting itself is stunning, but even more powerful are her words, highlighting the painful truths about the modern day human experience. 

I’m looking forward to discovering Fanni’s works at the Art and Fashion show at Palau Dalmases this weekend. Beforehand, I asked Fanni to tell us a little more about her work and inspiration.  

Hi Fanni, please tell us a little bit about yourself—where do you come from? What was your childhood like?

I was born in Budapest, Hungary in 1991.   

What are some of the questions that drive your work?

My work is centered around the themes of ideals and decadence. The co-presence of two antithetical concepts: birth & death, harmony & chaos, good & evil contrasting in a declining world where appearance is glorified. One question I often ask myself is: Can I embrace my darkness, my amputated parts, my dead parts and can I live with the female charm both as a blessing and a curse?

Amor and Psyche by Fanni Kopacsi
Amor and Psyche by Fanni Kopacsi

Your art has expanded beyond painting to include a wide range of materials. Do the different materials reflect your ideas or what you’re trying to communicate?

I started to use waste materials to emphasize the contrast between superficiality and decay. It was a conscious choice, although as time passed and I started to use more and more garbage I realized how much they go beyond the concept of decay. I found that as I transform these materials from something unworthy to something valuable, extracting them from their original contexts, they do transform me as well. It’s a kind of healing practice. 

What about color—or the lack of color? Does gold have any particular meaning for you?

Yes, colors do symbolize a lot of things for me. White is the color of purity, newness, illumination, the ultimate good or we can say maybe even the sublime. Conversely, white is also the color of death. Black, red, white and gold – the main colors I use are symbolizing descent, death, rebirth and sacrifice. 

Fanni Kopacsi
Working in her studio.
Venus by Fanni Kopacsi

What are your thoughts about the role of artists in the re/up-cycling movement?

I think artists always act as a mirror to what’s happening around them and in the world, so for me it’s more like a natural phenomena, rather than a movement.

I see you’re participating in the Daffodils Art Festival this weekend. Can you tell us a bit about this event and the artwork you’ll be sharing?

It’s a festival that brings together many different artists and artisans. I will be sharing some of my Venus sculptures/paintings and drawings. 

Do you have any big projects coming up or new work you can tell us about?

I am participating in a group show at Uxval Gochez Gallery in Barcelona in June.   

Lastly, where can people learn more about you and your art?

On my website www.fannikopacsi.com and on instagram where I share some inspirations, the process of creating my artworks, some of my poetry, and sketches too.

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